Colloidal Oatmeal Cream Recipe

Colloidal Oatmeal Cream Recipe – ingredient benefits:

Colloidal oatmeal benefits (skin):

  • Helps heal skin
  • Protects and moisturizes skin
  • Soothes and relieves minor skin irritations
  • Reduces redness and itching
  • Improves skin elasticity
Aloe vera gel benefits (skin):
  • Reduces scarring
  • Protects the skin by creating a natural barrier
  • Relieves sunburns
  • Destroys bacteria
  • Relieves inflammation and soreness
  • Helps heal burns, cuts and wounds
  • Sooths itchy skin
  • Helps sooth and heal psoriasis, eczema and acne
  • Moisturizes

Grapeseed oil benefits (skin):

  • Good for all skin types
  • Repairs skin damage from the sun
  • Helps slow the process of aging
  • Has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties
  • Helps prevent clogging pores and breakouts
  • Nourishes skin, helping keep it smooth and subtle
  • Easily absorbed into the skin
  • Helps to tighten and tone the skin
  • Helps to heal skin
  • Regenerates skin cells

Coconut oil benefits (skin):

  • Good for all skin types
  • Moisturizes skin
  • Helps heal skin
  • Protects the skin from free radical damage
  • Easily absorbed into the skin
  • Provides nutrients to the skin
  • Benefits to the skin’s connective tissue

Colloidal Oatmeal Cream Recipe:

Supplies:

4 x 112ml or 2 x224ml glass jars

Blender, food processor or stick blender

Ingredients

½ cup of aloe vera gel

½ cup colloidal oatmeal tea*

1 teaspoon of vegetable glycerin

⅓ cup of coconut oil

14g of beeswax

¼ cup of almond oil

½ cup grapeseed oil

Up to 1 ½ teaspoons essential oils or natural fragrance oils (optional). I used 1 tsp Sandalwood and ½ tsp Tea Tree essential oil for extra skin conditioning.

Soap safe colorant (Optional).

 

Place aloe vera gel, colloidal oatmeal tea* and glycerin in 2+ cup bowl. Place almond oil, grape seed oil, coconut oil and beeswax in a microwave safe bowl, microwave on high for 30 second and stir. Repeat in 20 second intervals until fully melted.

Run stick blender in aloe vera, colloidal oatmeal, glycerin mixture (a food processor may be used). Slowly pour in melted oils. As the oils are blended in, the cream will turn white. As soon as you have a mayonnaise-like consistency, stop motor, add essential oils and colorant, and then pulse blend. Do not over blend.

Transfer cream to glass jars while still warm because it thickens quickly. I use 4 oz decorative jelly jars. They are perfect as gifts, or as an addition to a spa gift basket.

*To make colloidal oatmeal tea; place 2 tablespoons steel-cut oatmeal in a coffee grinder. Grind oatmeal until it is the texture of very fine powder (this is colloidal oatmeal). Mix the colloidal oatmeal in 1 cup boiling water. Mix with a wire whisk until dissolved. Let stand for about 5 minutes. Pour your colloidal oatmeal/water mixture through a coffee filter into a cup. You want to end up with ½ cup colloidal oatmeal tea.

NOTE: Lasts a week or so if stored in a refrigerator.

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Homemade Sugar Scrub

The purpose of a body or face scrub is to remove dead skin cells. This is called exfoliation. When dead cells are removed, your skin becomes more vibrant. 

You do have to be careful of scrubs if your skin is sensitive or thin (the plight of aging skin). The recipe that follows is a gentle scrub and should be safe for most of you, but proceed with caution if you are older or have sensitive skin.

This recipe is for a brown sugar rub. We chose this one because the grains are finer in brown sugar than white sugar. Molasses, part of what makes brown sugar brown, is good for your skin because it is replete with glycolic. Glycolic acid is an alpha hydroxyl acid famed for making aging skin look more youthful.

The ingredients in this recipe are designed not just for exfoliation, but also the skin’s health. Colloidal oatmeal and aloe vera gel protect, nourish and heal the skin leaving it soft and smooth.

Homemade Sugar Scrub Recipe

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons brown sugar

2 tablespoons colloidal oatmeal (Colloidal oatmeal may be purchased or made at home. See below for instructions.)

2 tablespoons aloe vera gel

1 tablespoon honey

1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice (omit if you have very dry skin)

1 teaspoon olive oil

½ teaspoon molasses

To make colloidal oatmeal at home:

  • Put raw uncooked oats into a grinder or blender. A coffee grinder works well for this.
  • Grind the oats until they have the consistency of flour.

To make sure that the oats have been ground to the correct fineness, add a teaspoon of the ground oats to a glass of water and mix. The oats should absorb the water quickly giving it a milky look. If the particles sink readily to bottom of the glass, grind them a bit longer and retest.

To make the homemade sugar scrub:

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl until it forms a paste.

How to use the homemade sugar scrub:

  • Apply to moist skin as moist skin loses dead cells faster. The best time is after a shower or bath.
  • Dampen the skin with warm water
  • Apply the scrub evenly with finger tips in a circular motion to your face and neck (this improves circulation)
  • Massage gently for 30 – 60 seconds avoiding your eyes
  • Spend a bit more time on the forehead and chin region where dead skin tend to collect more frequently.
  • Gently rinse away the scrub and follow with a light moisturizer.
  • For best results use twice a week

Colloidal Oatmeal – A Really Really Simple Bath for Dry Itchy Skin

You may have an itchy skin because you are plagued with dry skin, eczema, psoriasis or a rash caused by poison ivy or another contact allergen. It might also be caused by those pesky mosquitoes or other insect bites. Whatever the cause, try a soothing oatmeal bath to calm that angry skin.

The perfect colloidal oatmeal bath

It’s really easy to create a colloidal oatmeal bath. First, however you need to make or purchase the colloidal oatmeal. It’s easy to make, simply put some regular oats in a coffee grinder and turn them into very fine flour.

Add enough of your colloidal oats to your bath to turn the water a milky color. Be sure and use a non-stick mat in your tub as oats will make it very slippery. Soak in the bath for 10 minutes and rinse with warm, not hot, water. There will be some particles in your bath water which I don’t mind. If you choose, you can avoid that by putting the oats in a sock. Tie off the open end and allow the warm water to flow over it as you fill the tub. After the tub is filled, squeeze the sock to force the “oat milk” into your bath. You can opt to take two or three colloidal oatmeal baths a day if you have an itchy rash.

You can also add 1½ teaspoons lavender essential oil which is good to help with eczema, psoriasis and allergies. Plus, lavender essential oil adds a delightful fragrance to your bath.

Pat your skin dry with a towel when you get out of the tub. If you rub your skin, you will irritate the itchy areas and make them itch worse.

 

The Unsung Hero Of Fat Loss!

SLEEP

As you begin scrambling for the latest and most scientific information relating to stripping off those last few layers of body fat that seem to cling to you for dear life, you’re likely coming across a wide range of content concerning the best foods for belly-fat loss.

Maybe you’re also finding the best exercises to help boost the metabolism, the best workout designs that promise to add more muscle definition, and the best times to be eating if you hope to maximize the amount of fat you burn throughout the day.

There’s no question about it, what you eat and how you exercise are two significant contributors to the overall success rate you see. But after that, it’s important to not overlook some of the other contributing factors that can sway the type of progress you experience.

Make no mistake, achieving maximum fat loss and getting that “ripped” look that you see on the cover of your favourite health and fitness magazine is a 24/7 endeavour. If you aren’t on top of the game at all times, there is a large chance you’ll falter.

One specific component that very often gets overlooked is that of sleep. No one ever thinks of sleep being a factor in success since, after all, you are barely conscious while you sleep. How much damage could you really do to your progress while you are sleeping?

The answer is that it’s not what you do while you’re sleeping per se, it’s the quality and quantity of sleep you get. Let’s dig a bit further so you can see the profound connection sleep has with your weight loss.

INCREASED DAYTIME CORTISOL LEVELS

One of the first major problems that are associated with a lack of sleep is an increased daytime cortisol level. As you may have already known, cortisol is a hormone that is released within the body that works to break down body tissues. In times of stress, you will find cortisol levels very high since the body is getting ready for the fight or flight response mechanism.

Dieting itself puts the body in a stressed state since it is taking in fewer calories than it would ideally like to function; therefore you’re already at risk for such problems as muscle mass loss (which occurs when high cortisol levels begin breaking down the body’s tissues).

In one study put on by the Laboratory of Physiology in Belgium, researchers noted that those who were shorting themselves of sleep noticed higher afternoon and early evening cortisol levels than those who were not.

IMPAIRED GLUCOSE CONTROL

Have you ever found that after a late night out or a night of simply tossing and turning where sleep was hard to come by, the next day you were craving carbohydrates like a pregnant woman a few days before delivery?

One study conducted in Chicago noted that on-going sleep deprivation is responsible for a number of changes in the hormonal release and metabolism of humans, especially increased hunger and appetite.

Often in very fatigued states the body senses this fatigue and perceives a low supply of energy as a result, kick-starting internal drives to eat (hunger).

In addition to this, the researchers also pointed out that sleep restriction can decrease glucose and insulin sensitivity, two of the most critical factors that are involved in the development or prevention of diabetes as well as regulating the satiety you feel after a meal is eaten.

While you may think staying up for that extra hour to catch your favourite TV isn’t really all that detrimental, if the truth is told it could be dramatically increasing the chances that you develop diabetes.

measuring visceral fat
Contact Edge Fitness Clubs to receive your Body Assessment

INCREASED VISCERAL ADIPOSE TISSUE

For most people on a fat loss diet, the visceral fat is the fat that’s most important to lose because it’s the type that will set you up for the greatest overall health threats.

While you may see subcutaneous fat gains easier (as this is the fat directly under the skin), a high level of fat surrounding the organs is really going to be problematic and could eventually be life threatening.

Researchers from the John Carroll University used a continuous dark versus continuous light exposure test to assess the impacts on a group of animals. They wanted to measure melatonin levels, the metabolic parameters, the circadian rhythm activity patterns, as well as any behaviour changes that took place when animals were either placed in a standard condition with 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness, 24 hours of darkness, or 24 hours of continuous light.

After the study was completed the researchers noticed that the 24 hour light animals demonstrated a significantly greater visceral adipose tissue than the other two groups who did have darkness hours as well as those who were always exposed to light noted a lower level of overall activity and started to become extremely irritable and easily excited.

The body naturally wants to maintain its normal circadian rhythm with proper light and dark periods for wakefulness and sleep, and when these are altered; negative events take place with regards to body fatness and overall health.

In another study performed in the Czech Republic and published in Physiological Research, researchers found that optimal body weight was strongly associated with test subjects who maintained seven hours of sleep each night, making that the guideline that you should try and shoot for.

While some rare individuals may find they feel fine on much lower levels of sleep (5-6 hours) and others may find they need a great deal more (9+ hours per night), for most adults living a regular lifestyle with added training, 7-8 hours of sleep is optimal.

Generally the more intense and frequent your training sessions are, the more sleep you may require in order to recover properly. In these situations if 8-9 hours is not manageable, short afternoon naps can sometimes do the trick.

SLEEP AND EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

Finally, you must not overlook the connection between the amount of sleep you get and your overall exercise performance. When you are short on sleep, it’s quite typical to find yourself struggling to maintain the usual level of exercise that you normally would tolerate quite well.

In addition to this, since sleep is the primary time the body recovers from exercise, it’s also when you will be rebuilding your torn muscle tissues. Without this recovery time, you’re going to go into your next exercise session at a disadvantage.

One of the key recommendations for combating over training syndrome, which will quickly take you away from your workouts and limit further fat loss, is getting quality sleep. Failing to do so could mean you having to take time away from your program, which will without question of a doubt, slow you down.

So make sure you’re getting your 7-8 hours of sleep each night. Not only are you going to feel better, think clearer, and be much stronger when it comes to battling those food cravings that are so common with fat loss diets, but you’ll also really be helping promote better long-term health as well.

REFERENCES
  1. Copinschi, G. (2005). Metabolic and endocrine effects of sleep deprivation. Essent Psychopharmacol. 6(6):341-7.
  2. Murphy, HM., & Wideman, CH. (2009). Constant light induced alterations in melatonin levels, food intake, feed efficiency, visceral adiposity, and circadian rhythms in rats. Oct;12(5):233-40.
  3. Leproult, R., & Van Cauter, E. (2010). Role of Sleep and Sleep Loss In Hormonal Release and Metabolism. Endocrine Development. 17:11-21.
  4. Backx, FJ. Et al. (2009). Evaluation and opportunities in overtraining approaches. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport. Dec;80(4):756-64.

 

Festive Prawns On The Braai

With chorizo, garlic and lemon dressing
Servings : 4

Ingredients

1/4 cup olive oil
1 chilli, deseeded and thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, crushed
4 fresh tomatoes, deseeded and chopped
100 g chorizo, thinly sliced
juice of 2 lemons
salt and freshly ground pepper
10 g parsley, roughly chopped
1.5 kg prawns, de-veined and butterflied
olive oil
lemon wedges for serving

Method

Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a frying pan and sauté chilli, garlic, tomatoes and chorizo together for a few minutes until tomatoes just begin to soften.
Add lemon juice, remaining oil and season with salt and pepper.
Remove from heat and add chopped parsley.
Drizzle prawns with a little oil and season with salt and pepper.

Grill prawns over hot coals or on a grill pan for a few minutes until the shells turn pink and fish is just cooked.
Serve immediately with lemon wedges and the chorizo dressing.

Recipe reprinted with permission of Source Food.

Chimmichurri chicken bake

Ingredients

  • CHIMMICHURRI PASTE:
  • 2 handful parsley, no stems
  • 2 handful fresh coriander
  • 1 handful baby spinach
  • 1/2 red onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely sliced
  • 4 Tbs olive oil
  • 2 Tbs lime or lemon juice
  • 1 red chilli (no seeds)
  • 20 g roasted almonds
  • FOR THE CHICKEN:
  • 6 chicken pieces (thighs and legs)
  • 500 g baby potatoes
  • 2 shallots, halved
  • 30 ml canola oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 100 g vine tomatoes

Method

Preheat the oven to 180°C

Combine the chimmichurri ingredients together in a blender to form a paste.

Put the chicken pieces in a separate bowl and add 3/4 of the chimmichurri paste and mix until the chicken pieces are fully coated then place them in a large baking tray.

Cut the baby potatoes in half and coat in oil, salt and pepper then scatter them evenly around the chicken pieces, toss in the garlic pieces.

Place the tray with chicken and potatoes in the oven for around 30 -40 minutes.

Once the chicken has been in the oven for around 30 minutes add the vine tomatoes onto the tray and then put the tray back into the oven until the chicken and potatoes are cooked – about 10 minutes.

Berry Popsicle

Ingredients

  • Berry coulis:
  • 250 ml mixed frozen berries
  • 80 ml xylitol granules
  • 15 ml water
  • Cheesecake layer:
  • 80 ml water
  • 80 ml xylitol granules
  • 5 ml lemon juice
  • 5 ml vanilla essence
  • 250 ml plain double cream yoghurt
  • 180 g plain cream cheese, at room temperature
  • Nutty layer:
  • 30 ml raw cashews, chopped
  • 30 ml toasted flakes
  • 30 ml desiccated coconut
  • 15 ml xylitol granules
  • 5 ml cocoa powder

Method

For the berry coulis, place the berries, xylitol and water in a small saucepan and simmer for 5 minutes. Press down on the berries with a spoon to crush them slightly and allow to cool. 

For the cheesecake layer, heat the water, xylitol, lemon juice and vanilla in a saucepan for 2 minutes until melted. Remove from the heat and allow to cool for 5 minutes. Combine with the yoghurt and cream cheese and whisk with an electric whisk until smooth. 

For the nutty layer, stir everything together. Add ¼ cup of the cheesecake mixture and stir until combined. 

To assemble, divide the berry coulis between 8 large popsicle moulds. Top it off with the cream cheese mixture, leaving about a 1cm gap at the top of each mould. Use a skewer to lightly swirl the berry coulis and cheesecake mixture together in each mould. Top each one off with a layer of the nutty mixture. Add wooden popsicle sticks and freeze for at least 6 hours or overnight. Check on the wooden popsicle sticks after 1 hour of freezing time to make sure they are still centered and standing up straight. Adjust if needed. 

Tip: Frozen berries give the best colour, but fresh berries can be used.

Fishcakes with barley salad and lemon drizzle

Mackerel and sardines are very good sources of omega 3 fatty acids. They play a crucial role in brain function, as well as normal growth and development. Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation and may help lower risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis.
Oats are a good source of soluble fibre- also known as oat beta-glucan. Research suggests that the soluble fibre in oats may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease by reducing cholesterol levels, specifically LDL cholesterol.

 

Servings 4

Ingredients

Fishcakes:

  • 1 can (400 g) of mackerel (middle cut)
  • ¼ cup oat bran
  • ½ cup grated carrot
  • 1 free-range egg
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 10g chopped fresh herbs (chives, dill, parsley)
  • salt and pepper
  • 2Tbs avocado oil

Barley Salad

  • 1 cup cooked pearl barley, cold
  • 40g watercress
  • ½ medium cucumber
  • 1 avocado
  • 50g almonds, raw and chopped
  • 50g mixed bean sprouts
  • 100g cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 50g sliced red onion
  • 50g basil
  • 10g fennel
  • 100g feta
  • salt and pepper

Lemon Drizzle

  • zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1tsp smooth Dijon mustard
  • 4Tbs extra virgin olive oil
  • 1tsp chopped chives
  • salt and pepper

Method

Fishcakes

  • Drain the mackerel of any liquid, and put it into a large mixing bowl.
  • Using a fork, shred the fish up until it’s fine and there are no large chunks.
  • Add the oat bran, carrot, egg, lemon zest, and chopped herbs, and mix well.
  • Leave the mixture to stand for about 30 minutes in the fridge, so the oat bran soaks up excess liquid in the mixture.
  • Separate the mixture into 8 equal sized balls, and shape them into patties.
  • Season the fishcakes with salt and pepper.
  • Put a large non-stick frying pan onto a medium heat and drizzle the oil into the pan.
  • Once the pan is hot, add the fishcakes and fry on the first side for around 2 minutes, until golden brown. Turn them over and repeat on the other side.

Barley Salad

  • Wash the cucumber, tomatoes and herbs.
  • Using a peeler, shave the cucumber into ribbons.
  • Cut the avocado in half, remove the skin and pip and cut the avocado into chunks.
  • In a large bowl, mix together the barley, cucumber ribbons, almonds, bean sprouts, tomatoes, onion, tear the fennel and basil up and add to the salad.
  • Assemble the salad on a platter. Spread the barley salad mixture on the bottom of the platter.
  • Add the chunks of avocado, and crumble the feta over the top of the salad. Sprinkle the watercress on top of the salad.

Lemon Drizzle

  • Whisk together the lemon juice, zest and mustard.
  • Drizzle the olive oil into the lemon mixture whilst whisking.

Mix in the chopped chives, and season with salt & pepper.

Chermoula-crusted fish with butternut and mint

Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 4x 200g salmon fillets
  • olive oil

Chermoula Sauce:

  • 10g fresh coriander, chopped
  • 1 small red chilli, chopped
  • ¼ tsp smoked paprika
  • 1tsp ground coriander
  • 1tsp ground cumin
  • 2Tbs olive oil
  • 1Tbs lemon juice
  • sea salt and black pepper

Butternut Couscous:

  • 2Tbs butter
  • 1 small butternut, cubed, parboiled
  • 5g fresh mint
  • 2 cup cooked and seasoned couscous
  • 75g pomegranate rubies
  • olive oil for drizzling
  • juice of ½ a lemon

Method

  • Preheat oven to 180ºC.
  • Mix together all sauce ingredients.
  • Place fish on a lined baking tray, top with sauce.
  • Season, bake for 7–10 min. Set aside.
  • Heat a frying pan, add butter and toss in butternut, pan-fry gently until golden brown and cooked through.
  • Season well, allow to cool. Toss with mint, couscous and pomegranate. Drizzle over olive oil and lemon juice.

Serve: With butternut couscous.

Lemon pork fillet schnitzels

Servings 2

Ingredients

Potato salad

  • 400g potatoes
  • 3Tbs mayonnaise
  • 1Tbs crème fraîche
  • 2Tbs baby capers – drained
  • 1 lemon’s zest
  • 2tsp lemon juice
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1tsp flat leaf parsley – finely chopped

For the schnitzels

  • 2 x 180g pork fillets – fat trimmed
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1large free-range egg
  • 2Tbs plain flour
  • 75g coarse dried white breadcrumbs
  • ½ lemon zest – finely grated
  • 15g Parmesan – finely grated
  • 300ml cooking oil

Method

For the potato salad:

  • Half-fill a pan with salted water and bring to the boil.
  • Add the potatoes and return to the stove. Cook for 15 – 18 minutes or until just tender. Drain in a colander and rinse under running water until cold.
  • Mix the mayonnaise, crème fraîche, capers, parsley and lemon juice in a large bowl.
  • Cut the potatoes and stir into the mayonnaise dressing with the lemon zest.
  • Season to taste.

For the pork schnitzels:

  • Sandwich the pork between 2 sheets of cling film.
  • Flatten using a rolling pin or meat mallet to create an even thickness of ½ – 1 cm.
  • Remove the cling film and cut the flattened fillet in half lengthways.
  • Season on both sides with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Repeat the process with the remaining pork.
  • Beat the egg in a bowl. Sprinkle the flour onto a plate.
  • Mix the breadcrumbs, lemon zest, Parmesan and a good pinch of salt in a shallow bowl until well combined.
  • Dredge each piece of pork first into the flour, dip it into the beaten egg, and cover it in the breadcrumb mixture until completely coated.
  • Heat the oil in a large frying pan. Add 2 of the schnitzels to the pan and fry for 2 – 3 minutes on each side until the coating is crisp and golden brown.
  • Remove from the pan and drain on kitchen towel. Repeat the process with the remaining pork schnitzels.
  • Season with a squeeze of lemon.